The Legacy of Science: Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934)

Second floor- The exhibition narrates the life and work of Ramon y Cajal, one of the most important researchers of all time both nationally and internationally. In 1906 he received the Nobel Prize for his work on the structure of the nervous system.
Fotografía de Ramón y Cajal, científico español con gran relevancia nacional e internacional

Rebellious and amusing, great lover of photography and drawing, youth Ramon y Cajal studied Medicine in Zaragoza influenced by his father's profession.

In Madrid, when he was carrying out his doctoral thesis with Aureliano Maestre de San Juan, he discovered the vocation of his life, scientific research work. Knowing the importance of the Treaty of Golgi on the central nervous system and using the technique of silver staining to stain nerve cells, he was able to discover that the nervous system consisted of independent cells, called neurons, and thus he was able to make neurons “Law of dynamic polarization” against the opinion of the international community histological. In 1906 he received the Nobel Prize for his work on the structure of the nervous system.
The content of the exhibition has a high scientific rigor, developed by José María López Piñero (1933-2010), physician and specialist in the history of science.