Conference. What happens with your free will in a quantum mechanical universe? Gerard 't Hooft. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1999. November 13, 2018

Finished event


Conference. What happens with your free will in a quantum mechanical universe? Gerard 't Hooft. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1999. November 13, 2018. Free access, upon registration, at the Santiago Grisolía Auditorium of the Museum of Sciences from 7:00 p.m.
Conference. What happens with your free will in a quantum mechanical universe? Gerard 't Hooft. Nobel Prize in Physics in 1999. November 13, 2018

Quantum mechanics is a mathematical scheme describing the dynamical features of tiny objects such as atoms and molecules but also waves in sub-atomic particles. The most popular interpretations of our equations is that particles often make random choices out of some sort of free will, and that also people have free will, which means that ‘nothing at all’ explains some of your actions.

However, one can also maintain a more sober conclusion: our equations give uncertain predictions just because of fundamental uncertainties on where all these tiny particles are exactly, and in what state they are, and what laws they follow. Most researchers claim that such explanations have been “proven” not to agree with the equations, but one can certainly challenge such assertions. Should physicists give up any hopes to find equations that tell particles how to behave, with certainty? What would then happen to your ‘free will’?

 

Program:

6.30 pm. Accreditations
7:00 pm. Conference at the Santiago Grisolía Auditorium
8.00 pm. End of the conference and start of the conference
8.30 pm. End of activity

Access to the activity will be made through the west door of the Menor Street of the Museu (next to the Hemisfèric)

The conference will be given in English with simultaneous translation.