The Science Museum deals 'The Ancient Egypt Medicine' among the scientific method and magic beliefs

Jan 11, 2012

Lecture Thursday January 12 at 7.30 p.m.
The Science Museum deals 'The Ancient Egypt Medicine' among the scientific method and magic beliefs

The museum deals Thursday January 12 how medicine was 5000 years ago in the ancient Egypt, a discipline that develops among the scientific method and the application of magic-religious beliefs, as pointed out the Egyptologist Jose Lull. He will be given a lecture within the ‘True to Science’ cycle, sponsored by Lavazza Coffee. Free access activity upon registration.

From 7.30 p.m. in Santiago Grisolia Auditorium of the Príncipe Felipe Science Museum, the Egyptologist Josep Llull will be given the lecture ‘Ancient Egypt Medicine’ that will bring this discipline closer to the public, which has a great prestige in ancient Egyptian society with an early development. As Lull explains ‘the Egyptian priest Manetón tells how at the beginning of the I Dynasty, about five thousands years ago the pharaoh Atotis practiced medicine and wrote books of anatomy’

In ancient Egypt, "physicians, called ‘Sunu’ in their language, were trained people and well regard in Egyptian society, which formed part of the cultural elite." They went beyond science and, in those occasions in which the answers were not available to them, practiced magic spells and calls to deity in search of solutions.

"The Sunu - exposes Lull - are among the scientific method and the application of magic-religious beliefs. Know the use of potions made with animal, vegetable or mineral ingredients, as shown worked perfectly, but also resorted to irrational solutions typical of a supernatural world."

This expert said that the medicine was for the Egyptians a discipline strongly linked to religion, and notes that one example is the medical papyrus Ebers. In his introduction indicates that it was found in the presence of the statue of the god Anubis in ancient city Khem, "what can be gathered from it is that the recipes given in the papyrus were inspired by his own deity."

José Lull will introduce to the public in this fascinating world in which these physicians were faced with more than two hundred types of diseases or injuries, illness affecting heart, the urinary, digestive and neurological system, among others.

As explained the Egyptologist, also fought diseases such as malaria and schistosomiasis commonly affecting the peasants who worked on the bank of the Nile river and the delta, in stagnant water in canals and tanks; Also regarding to the population engaged in large works, there are many cases of trauma whose importance is reflected as the Smith papyrus.

If you missed out or want to listen again the conference of the Egyptologist, José Lull, click here: conference of José Lull.