THE HEMISFÈRIC IMAX CINEMA OFFERS A VOYAGE ROUND THE UNIVERSE AT THE HANDS OF THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

Dec 1, 2010

Tomorrow, Thursday, sees the Spanish première of the IMAX film “Hubble. Exploring the Universe”
THE HEMISFÈRIC IMAX CINEMA OFFERS A VOYAGE ROUND THE UNIVERSE AT THE HANDS OF THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE The Hemisfèric of the City of Arts and Sciences is showing, from tomorrow, Thursday 2nd December, a voyage round the universe as seen from the Hubble space telescope. For the first time in Spain this production “Hubble. Exploring the Universe”, made in collaboration with NASA and which tells the story of the fifth maintenance mission of this telescope carried out in the year 2009, can be seen in Spain.

The crew of the Atlantis space shuttle was trained to use the type of camera necessary for the film, so it was the crew themselves who were responsible for taking the images of this historic mission. They recorded impressive sequences of the five “space walks” required for the repairs as well as the efforts made to capture images of the telescope in orbit with the mechanical arm of the Atlantis in movement.

The space telescope Hubble is the first space observatory in the world situated at 350 kilometres from the Earth, making it an invaluable tool for astronomers. Observations made using the Hubble have solved many of the mysteries that have been under debate for years and have revealed new unexpected phenomena in space. .

The production combines IMAX scenes with images taken by the telescope over almost 20 years. “Hubble. Exploring the Universe”, therefore, allows the spectator to travel through far-off galaxies and offers a unique perspective on the legacy of this space telescope.

Additionally, anyone who goes to the “Zero Gravity” exhibition, made in collaboration with International Space Agency (ISA) at the Príncipe Felipe Science Museum can also see some original pieces that used to form part of the Hubble, such as one of its solar panels or the Faint Object Camera (FOC) that was a fundamental part of the telescope for 12 years and which recorded high resolution images of weak heavenly objects in deep space.